Sum of All Thrills

Sum of All Thrills

Scouts can build their own theme park ride!

Visit Epcots Innovention building and stop by Sum of All Thrills.  This is where scouts and their ride partner will take a turn in the Designer Lab creating their one-of-a-kind ride experience. Using an interactive touchscreen design panel, scouts can add drops, barrel rolls, twists and turns using their math, science and engineering know how. During the testing phase, adjust height, velocity and follow other recommendations to modify your ride experience based on mild to wild settings.

Once your ride design has been locked into the system, head up a short flight of stairs while your ride specifications are programmed into a 4-D robotic simulator. Buckle-up and get ready to feel every bump, twist and drop of the ultimate ride you just created – complete with the realism of high-definition video, audio and motion.

Want a little more Disney magic? After your ride, you’ll receive a card with your one-of-a-kind ride experience program. Visit MathMovesU to replay your ride on your home pc. Not visiting the parks soon enough? The MathMovesU site also has an online Design Your Own Ride and Game experience scouts may want to check out.

Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Engineer

Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Engineer

Do all of these:
1. Pick one type of engineer. With the help of the Internet, your local
library, or a local engineer you may know or locate, discover and
record in your book three things that describe what that engineer
does. (Be sure to have your Webelos den leader, parent, or
guardian’s permission to use the Internet.) Share your findings with
your Webelos den.
2. Learn to follow engineering design principles by doing the following:
a. Examine a set of blueprints. Using these as a model,
construct your own set of blueprints or plans to design a
project.
b. Using the blueprints or plans from your own design,
construct your project. Your project may be something useful
or something fun.
c. Share your project with your Webelos den and your pack by
displaying the project at a pack meeting.
3. Explore other fields of engineering and how they have helped form
our past, present, and future.
4. Pick and do two projects using the engineering skills you
have learned. Share your projects with your den, and also exhibit
them at a pack meeting.


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Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Engineer

Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Earth Rocks!

Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Earth Rocks!

1. Do the following:
a. Explain the meaning of the word “geology.”
b. Explain why this kind of science is an important part of your
world.
c. Share with your family or with your den what you learned
about the meaning of geology.
2. Look for different kinds of rocks or minerals while on a rock hunt with
your family or your den.
3. Do the following:
a. Identify the rocks you see on your rock hunt. Use the chart in
your handbook that shows the three kinds of rocks and
describes minerals to determine which types of rocks you
have collected.
b. With a magnifying glass, take a closer look at your collection.
Determine any differences between your specimens.
c. Share what you see with your family or den.
4. Do the following:
a. With your family or den, make a mineral test kit, and test
rocks according to the Mohs scale of mineral hardness.
b. Record the results in your handbook.
5. With your family or den, identify on a road map of your state some
geological features in your area.
6. Do the following:
a. Identify some of the geological building materials used in
building your home.
b. Identify some of the geological materials used around your
community.
c. Record the items you find.
7. Do either 7a or 7b:
a. Go on an outing with your family or den to one of the nearby
locations you discovered on your state map, and record what
you see as you look at the geographical surroundings. Share
with your family or den while on this outing what you notice
that might change this location in the future (wind, water, ice,
drought, erosion).
b. Do the following:
i. With your family or your den, visit with a geologist or earth
scientist and discover the many career fields that are
included in the science of geology.
ii. Ask the geologist or earth scientist about the
importance of fossils that are found.
iii. Ask the geologist or earth scientist what you can do
to help preserve our natural resources.
8. Do at least one earth science demonstration or investigation
with your den or with adult supervision, and explore geology in
action.


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Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Earth Rocks!

Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Adventures in Science

Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Adventures in Science

Do all of these:
1. An experiment is a “fair test” to compare possible explanations. Draw
a picture of a fair test that shows what you need to do to test a
fertilizer’s effects on plant growth.
2. Visit a museum, a college, a laboratory, an observatory, a zoo, an
aquarium, or other facility that employs scientists. Prepare three
questions ahead of time, and talk to a scientist about his or her work.
3. Complete any four of the following:
a. Carry out the experiment you designed for requirement 1,
above. Report what you learned about the effect of fertilizer
on the plants that you grew.
b. Carry out the experiment you designed for requirement 1,
but change the independent variable. Report what you
learned about the effect of changing the variable on the
plants that you grew.
c. Build a model solar system. Chart the distances between the
38 planets so that the model is to scale. Use what you learn
from this requirement to explain the value of making a model
in science.
d. With adult supervision, build and launch a model rocket. Use
the rocket to design a fair test to answer a question about
force or motion.
e. Create two circuits of three light bulbs and a battery.
Construct one as a series circuit and the other as a parallel
circuit.
f. Study the night sky. Sketch the appearance of the North Star
(Polaris) and the Big Dipper (part of the Ursa Major
constellation) over at least six hours. Describe what you
observed, and explain the meaning of your observations.
g. With adult assistance, explore safe chemical reactions with
household materials. Using two substances, observe what
happens when the amounts of the reactants are increased.
h. Explore properties of motion on a playground. How does the
weight of a person affect how fast they slide down a slide or
how fast a swing moves? Design a fair test to answer one of
those questions.
i. Read a biography of a scientist. Tell your den leader
or the other members of your den what the scientist was
famous for and why his or her work is important.


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Webelos & AOL Elective Adventure: Adventures in Science


 

Bear Elective Adventure: Super Science

Bear Elective Adventure: Super Science

1. Make static electricity by rubbing a balloon or a plastic or rubber comb on a fleece blanket or wool sweater. Explain what you learned.
2. Conduct a balloon or other static electricity investigation that demonstrates properties of static electricity. Explain what you learned.
3. Conduct one other static electricity investigation. Explain what you learned.
4. Do a sink-or-float investigation. Explain what you learned.
5. Do a color-morphing investigation. Explain what you learned.
6. Do a color-layering investigation. Explain what you learned.


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Bear Elective Adventure: Robotics

Bear Elective Adventure: Robotics

1. Identify six tasks performed by robots.
2. Learn about some instances where a robot could be used in place of a human for work. Research one robot that does this type of work, and present what you learn to your den.
3. Build a robot hand. Show how it works like a human hand and how it is different from a human hand.
4. Build your own robot.
5. Visit a place that uses robots.


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Bear Elective Adventure: Make It Move

Bear Elective Adventure: Make It Move

1. Create an “exploding” craft stick reaction.
2. Make two simple pulleys, and use them to move objects.
3. Make a lever by creating a seesaw using a spool and a wooden paint stirrer. Explore the way it balances by placing different objects on each end.
4. Do the following:
a. Draw a Rube Goldberg–type machine. Include at least six steps to complete your action.
b. Construct a real Rube Goldberg–type machine to complete a task assigned by your den leader. Use at least two simple machines and include at least four steps.


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Bear Elective Adventure: Forensics

Bear Elective Adventure: Forensics

1. Talk with your family and den about forensics and how it is used to help solve crimes.
2. Analyze your fingerprints.
3. Learn about chromatography and how it is used in solving crimes. Do an investigation using different types of black, felt-tip markers. Share your results with your den.
4. Do an analysis of four different substances: salt, sugar, baking soda, and cornstarch.
5. Make a shoe imprint.
6. Visit the sheriff’s office or police station in your town. Find out how officers collect evidence.
7. Learn about the different jobs available in forensic science. Choose two, and find out what is required to work those jobs. Share what you learned with your den.
8. Learn how animals are used to gather important evidence. Talk about your findings with your den.


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Wolf Elective Adventure: Digging in the Past

Wolf Elective Adventure: Digging in the Past

1. Play a game that demonstrates your knowledge of dinosaurs, such as a dinosaur match game.
2. Create an imaginary dinosaur. Share with your den its name, what it eats, and where it lives.
3. Make a fossil cast.
4. Make a dinosaur dig.
5. Make edible fossil layers. Explain how this snack is a good model for the formation of fossils.
6. Be a paleontologist, and dig through the dinosaur digs made by your den. Show and explain the ways a paleontologist works carefully during a dig.


 

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Wolf Elective Adventure: Air of the Wolf

Wolf Elective Adventure: Air of the Wolf

  1. Do the following investigations:
    1. Conduct an investigation about the weight of air.
    2. Conduct an investigation about air temperature.
    3. Conduct at least one of the following investigations to see how air affects different objects:
      1. Make a paper airplane and fly it five times. Make a change to its shape to help it fly farther. Try it at least five times.
      2. Make a balloon-powered sled or a balloon-powered boat. Test your sled or boat with larger and smaller balloons.
      3. Bounce a basketball that doesn’t have enough air in it. Then bounce it when it has the right amount of air in it. Do each one 10 times. Describe how the balls bounce differently when the amount of air changes.
      4. Roll a tire or ball that doesn’t have enough air in it, and then roll it again with the right amount of air. Describe differences in how they move.
  2. Do the following:
    1. With other members of your den, go outside and record the sounds you hear. Identify which of these sounds is the result of moving air.
    2. Create a musical wind instrument, and play it as part of a den band.
    3. With an adult, conduct an investigation on how speed can affect sound.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Explain the rules for safely flying kites.
    2. Make a kite using household materials.
  4. If your den or your pack has a kite derby, space derby or rain-gutter regatta, participate in the fun. Or build a kite or rain-gutter regatta boat with your family. Explain how air helps the vehicle move.

 

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