Tiger Cub Achievement 5 – Let’s Go Outdoors

Let’s Go Outdoors

5F – Family Activity
Go outside and watch the weather. (also part of Leave No Trace Award)

5D – Den Activity
With a crayon or colored pencil and a piece of paper make a leaf rubbing.

5G – Go See It Activity
Take a hike with your den.

More ideas for Tiger Cubs Scouting WDW:
#1 Making My Family Special
#2 Where I Live
#3 Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe
#4 How I Tell It
Tiger Cub Electives

Tiger Cub Achievement 4 – How I Tell It

How I Tell It

4F – Family Activity
At a family meal, each family member take turns telling the others one thing that happened to him or her that day. Remember to practice being a good listener while you wait for your turn to talk.

Scouts – tell your family about your favorite ride or attraction.

4D – Den Activity
Play “Tell It Like It Isn’t”

4G – Go See It Activity
Visit a television station, radio station, or newspaper office. Find out how people there communicate with others.

Visit Disney’s Hollywood Studios – once a working studio lot, now features revealing backstage tours and many popular TV and movie attractions.

More ideas for Tiger Cubs Scouting WDW:
#1 Making My Family Special
#2 Where I Live
#3 Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe
#5 Let’s Go Outdoors
Tiger Cub Electives

Tiger Cub Achievement 3 – Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe

Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe

3F – Family Activity
a. With your family, plan a fire drill then practice it in your home.
Visit EPCOT Innoventions West:  Where’s the Fire? a hands on, interactive exhibit with fire safety kiosks, a team game house, a fire safety house and a 30 foot fire truck.

b. With your adult partner, plan what to do if you became lost or separated from your family in a strange place.
Talk about and create a plan:  what to do if you and your scout get separated in the parks, on the buses or at the resort hotels.

3D – Den Activity
Make a Food Guide Pyramid
Disney Parks and Resorts, is committed to offering a wide range of food options for you and your family. They provide menu selections for Guests of all ages (including children) who seek well-balanced meals, snacks and beverages.

Kids’ Picks offerings make it easy for kids to have a healthy meal — choices include carrot sticks, grapes, apple slices, applesauce, jello.

3G – Go See It Activity
Learn the rules of a game or sport. Then, go watch an amateur or professional game or sporting event.

ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex – “ESPN innovation and entertainment join the magic and hospitality of Walt Disney World® Resort at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. From a state-of-the-art broadcast center and digital experience, to professionally kept fields and courts, there is no other sports facility like this on earth!”

More ideas for Tiger Cubs Scouting WDW:
#1 Making My Family Special
#2 Where I Live
#4 How I Tell It
#5 Let’s Go Outdoors
Tiger Cub Electives

 

Tiger Cub Achievement 2 – Where I Live

Where I Live

2F – Family Activity
Look at a map of your community with your adult partner.

2D – Den Activity
Practice the Pledge of Allegiance with your den, and participate in a den or pack flag ceremony.

2G – Go See It Activity
Visit a police station or fire station. Ask someone who works there how he or she helps people in your community.

More ideas for Tiger Cubs who are Scouting WDW:
#1 Making My Family Special
#3 Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe
#4 How I Tell It
#5 Let’s Go Outdoors
Tiger Cub Elective

 

Tiger Cub Achievement 1 – Making My Family Special

Making My Family Special

1F – Family Activity
Think of one chore you can do with your adult partner. Complete it together. 

1D – Den Activity
Make a family scrapbook.

1G – Go See It Activity
Go to a library, historical society, museum, old farm or historical building, or visit an older person in your community. Discover how family life was the same and how it was different many years ago.

More ideas for Tiger Cubs who are Scouting WDW:
#2 Where I Live
#3 Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe
#4 How I Tell It
#5 Let’s Go Outdoors
Tiger Cub Electives

 

Scout Law Wording & Interpretation

Scout Law

A Scout is: Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, Reverent.


Each of the Scout Law’s 12 points has a standard explanation that is part of the full wording of the Law. The original wording went unchanged for 61 years (1911-72). In 1972, the explanation was rewritten, and it seems the BSA just can’t leave the explanation alone, changing it almost every time the Scout Handbook is updated, even though the ‘improvements’ are of questionable value.

1911-72 Wording

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy. A Scout’s honor is to be trusted. If he were to violate his honor by telling a lie or by cheating or by not doing exactly a given task, when trusted on his honor, he may be directed to hand over his Scout badge.
  • Loyal. He is loyal to all to whom loyalty is due, his Scout leader, his home and parents and country.
  • Helpful. He must be prepared at any time to save life, help injured persons, and share the home duties. He must do at least one Good Turn to somebody every day.
  • Friendly. He is a friend to all and a brother to every other Scout.
  • Courteous. He is polite to all, especially to women, children, old people, and the weak and helpless. He must not take pay for being helpful or courteous.
  • Kind. He is a friend to animals. He will not kill nor hurt any living creature needlessly, but will strive to save and protect all harmless life.
  • Obedient. He obeys his parents, Scoutmaster, patrol leader, and all other duly constituted authorities.
  • Cheerful. He smiles whenever he can. His obedience to orders is prompt and cheery. He never shirks nor grumbles at hardships.
  • Thrifty. He does not wantonly destroy property. He works faithfully, wastes nothing, and makes the best use of his opportunities. He saves his money so that he may pay his own way, be generous to those in need, and helpful to worthy objects. He may work for pay, but must not receive tips for courtesies or Good Turns.
  • Brave. He has the courage to face danger in spite of fear and to stand up for the right against the coaxings of friends or the jeers or threats of enemies, and defeat does not down him.
  • Clean. He keeps clean in body and thought; stands for clean speech, clean sport, clean habits; and travels with a clean crowd.
  • Reverent. He is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties and respects the convictions of others in matters of custom and religion.

1972 Wording

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy. A Scout tells the truth. He keeps his promises. Honesty is part of his code of conduct. People can depend on him.
  • Loyal. A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.
  • Helpful. A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.
  • Friendly. A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.
  • Courteous. A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together.
  • Kind. A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle. He treats others as he wants to be treated. He does not hurt or kill harmless things without reason.
  • Obedient. A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them.
  • Cheerful. A Scout looks for the bright side of things. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.
  • Thrifty. A Scout works to pay his way and to help others. He saves for unforeseen needs. He protects and conserves natural resources. He carefully uses time and property.
  • Brave. A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at or threaten him.
  • Clean. A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean. He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals. He helps keep his home and community clean.
  • Reverent. A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others.

1990 Wording

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy. A Scout tells the truth. He keeps his promises. Honesty is part of his code of conduct. People can always depend on him. [added “always”]
  • Loyal. A Scout is true to his family, friends, Scout leaders, school, nation, and world community. [reversed the order of “friends” and “Scout leaders”; added “and world community”]
  • Helpful. A Scout is concerned about other people. He willingly volunteers to help others without expecting payment or reward. [second sentence completely reworded]
  • Friendly. A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs that are different from his own. [changed “other than” to “that are different from”]
  • Courteous. A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows that good manners make it easier for people to get along together. [added “that”]
  • Kind. A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle. He treats others as he wants to be treated. He does not harm or kill anything without reason. [changed “hurt” to “harm” and “harmless things” to “anything”]
  • Obedient. A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them. [no change]
  • Cheerful. A Scout looks for the bright side of things. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy. [no change]
  • Thrifty. A Scout works to pay his way and to help others. He saves for the future. He protects and conserves natural resources. He carefully uses time and property. [changed “unforeseen needs” to “the future”]
  • Brave. A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at him or threaten him. [added “him” after “laugh at”]
  • Clean. A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean. He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals. He helps keep his home and community clean. [no change]
  • Reverent. A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others. [no change]

1999 Wording

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy. A Scout tells the truth. He is honest, and he keeps his promises. People can depend on him. [combined second & third sentences; deleted “always”]
  • Loyal. A Scout is true to his family, friends, Scout leaders, school, and nation. [deleted “world community”]
  • Helpful. A Scout cares about other people. He willingly volunteers to help others without expecting payment or reward. [changed “is concerned” to “cares”]
  • Friendly. A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He offers his friendship to people of all races and nations, and respects them even if their beliefs and customs are different from his own. [combined third & fourth sentences, rewriting the second sentence]
  • Courteous. A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows that using good manners makes it easier for people to get along. [added “using” and deleted “together”]
  • Kind. A Scout knows there is strength in being gentle. He treats others as he wants to be treated. Without good reason, he does not harm or kill any living thing. [changed “understands” to “knows”, rearranged third sentence adding “good” & “living”]
  • Obedient. A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them. [no change]
  • Cheerful. A Scout looks for the bright side of things. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy. [changed “things” to “life”]
  • Thrifty. A Scout works to pay his way and to help others. He saves for the future. He protects and conserves natural resources. He carefully uses time and property. [no change]
  • Brave. A Scout can face danger although he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at him or threaten him. [changed “even if” to “although”]
  • Clean. A Scout keeps his body and mind fit. He chooses the company of those who live by high standards. He helps keep his home and community clean. [deleted “and clean”, completely rewrote second sentence]
  • Reverent. A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others. [no change]

2009 Wording

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy. A Scout tells the truth. He is honest, and he keeps his promises. People can depend on him. [no change]
  • Loyal. A Scout is loyal to those to whom loyalty is due. [almost restores the 1911 wording; BSA has failed for 100 years to come up with a definition of ‘loyal’ understandable to an 11-year-old]
  • Helpful. A Scout cares about other people. He helps others without expecting payment or reward. He fulfills his duties to his family by helping at home. [simplifies the second sentence, and adds a new third sentence]
  • Friendly. A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He offers his friendship to people of all races, religions, and nations, and respects them even if their beliefs and customs are different from his own. [adds “religions” in addition to races and nations]
  • Courteous. A Scout is polite to people of all ages and positions. He understands that using good manners makes it easier for people to get along. [minor re-wording]
  • Kind. A Scout treats others as he wants to be treated. He knows there is strength in being gentle. He does not harm or kill any living thing without good reason. [minor re-wording and re-ordering]
  • Obedient. A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he seeks to have them changed in an orderly way. [minor re-wording to last sentence]
  • Cheerful. A Scout looks for the bright side of life. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way and tries his best to make others happy, too. [minor re-wording]
  • Thrifty. A Scout works to pay his way and to help others. He saves for the future. He protects and conserves natural resources. He is careful in his use of time and property. [very minor change to last sentence]
  • Brave. A Scout faces danger even if he is afraid. [minor re-wording to first sentence; deletes second sentence]
  • Clean. A Scout keeps his body and mind fit. He chooses friends who also live by high standards. He avoids profanity and pornography. He helps keep his home and community clean. [changes ‘company’ in second sentence to “friends”; adds sentence about profanity and pornography]
  • Reverent. A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others. [no change]

Another Interpretation

Here is another interpretation of the 12 points of the Scout Law, as we present them to our Scouts at the beginning of summer camp:

  1. Tell the truth—always!
  2. Stand by and stick up for the other Scouts.
  3. Help anyone who needs your help.
  4. Be a friend to every other Scout (yes, every other Scout).
  5. Be polite to everyone (everyone).
  6. Treat others the way you would like them to treat you.
  7. Do what you’re asked to do (don’t complain, don’t whine).
  8. Be cheerful, even in the rain.
  9. Take care of your stuff, and spend your money wisely.
  10. Be brave, even if you are afraid, and stick up for what you know is right.
  11. Wash your Kool-Aid mustache, take a shower every day—and keep your mind, your thoughts, and your mouth as clean as your body.
  12. Keep God in your daily life, and notice his handiwork everywhere we go.

Information from www.troop97.net