Disney Family Tree & Crest

Disney Family Tree & Crest

Scouts who need to complete a family tree for an adventure elective requirement or a Merit Badge requirement should start with their name and include at least two additional generations. While completing a family tree, parents and scouts can discuss the history, traditions, and culture of their family heritage.

My Family Tree for the Core Value: Faith

Faith means having inner strength and confidence based on trust in a higher power. Understanding one’s family tree, ancestors, and heritage brings stories to life of the strength and confidence of our family members. It also tells of their belief and trust in a higher power to help bring them safely to the United States. In years past, many immigrants traveled by boat. What faith they had in that boat that would change their lives!  Courtesy April 2013 Cub Scout Meeting Guide

SleepingBeautyCastleCrest

Want a little more Disney magic?  Use the Disney coat of arms found above Sleeping Beauty’s castle in Disneyland as inspiration for creating your own coat of arms.

Would your scout like a copy of the Disney inspired Family Tree ? Request a PDF copy here:

Religious Freedom and the American Adventure

Religious Freedom and the American Adventure

The American Adventure Pavilion and feature attraction takes guests on a trip through America’s history. The 30 minute show chronicles Americas illustrious past and promising future through audio-animatronics, film and music.

Beginning with the landing of the Mayflower, watch and see how the American ideals ~ Freedom, Innovation, Independence, and Compassion precipitated more key events like the Boston Tea Party, the winter at Valley Forge, the penning of the Declaration of Independence, the Civil War, industrialization and the Great Depression. Along the way, you’ll also meet inspiring Americans:

Susan B. Anthony
Alexander Graham Bell
Chief Joseph
Frederick Douglass
Thomas Jefferson
John F. Kennedy
Martin Luther King Jr.
Will Rogers
Teddy Roosevelt

The American Adventure Pavilion also includes:

  • quotes from famous Americans
  • paintings of American life throughout history
  • the Hall of Flags exhibit, a display of the different flags throughout U.S. history 
More Pilgrim references in the American Pavilion, Epcot

The Pilgrims were among the first Americans to look for religious freedom.

Seeds of Hope | Painting This painting portrays a Native American teaching the Plymouth Pilgrims how to plant corn.

Freedom | Pilgrim Statue Statues personifying various American ideals are located throughout The American Adventure theatre.

American Heritage Merit Badge

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A YES class viewing the Seal in the Hall of Presidents.

Complete 5 out of 10 American Heritage Merit Badge requirements (in bold below) when you participate in Disney’s Youth Education Series (Y.E.S.) class – ‘Discovering the American Spirit’.

American Heritage Merit Badge requirements:

1. Read the Declaration of Independence. Pay close attention to the section that begins with “We hold these truths to be self-evident” and ends with “to provide new Guards for future security.” Rewrite that section in your own words, making it as easy to understand as possible. Then share your writing with your merit badge counselor and discuss the importance of the Declaration of Independence.

2. Do TWO of the following:
a. Select two individuals from American history, one a political leader (a president, senator, etc.) and the other a private citizen (a writer, religious leader, etc.). Find out about each person’s accomplishments and compare the contributions each has made to America’s heritage.
b. With your counselor’s approval, choose an organization that has promoted some type of positive change in American society. Find out why the organization believed this change was necessary and how it helped to accomplish the change. Discuss how this organization is related to events or situations from America’s past.
c. With your counselor’s approval, interview two veterans of the U.S. military. Find out what their experiences were like. Ask the veterans what they believe they accomplished.
d. With your counselor’s approval, interview three people in your community of different ages and occupations. Ask these people what America means to them, what they think is special about this country, and what American traditions they feel are important to preserve.

3. Do the following:
a. Select a topic that is currently in the news. Describe to your counselor what is happening. Explain how today’s events are related to or affected by the events and values of America’s past.
b. For each of the following, describe its adoption, tell about any changes since its adoption, and explain how each one continues to influence Americans today: the flag, the Pledge of Allegiance, the seal, the motto, and the national anthem.
c. Research your family’s history. Find out how various events and situations in American history affected your family. If your family immigrated to America, tell the reasons why. Share what you find with your counselor.

4. TWO of the following:
a. Explain what is meant by the National Register of Historic Places. Describe how a property becomes eligible for listing. Make a map of your local area, marking the points of historical interest. Tell about any National Register properties in your area. Share the map with your counselor, and describe the historical points you have indicated.
b. Research an event of historical importance that took place in or near your area. If possible, visit the place. Tell your counselor about the event and how it affected local history. Describe how the area looked then and what it now looks like.
c. Find out when, why, and how your town or neighborhood started, and what ethnic, national, or racial groups played a part. Find out how the area has changed over the past 50 years and try to explain why.
d. Take an active part in a program about an event or person in American history. Report to your counselor about the program, the part you took, and the subject.
e. Visit a historic trail or walk in your area. After your visit, share with your counselor what you have learned. Discuss the importance of this location and explain why you think it might qualify for National Register listing.

5. Do ONE of the following:
a. Watch two motion pictures (with the approval and permission of your counselor and parent) that are set in some period of American history. Describe to your counselor how accurate each film is with regard to the historical events depicted and also with regard to the way the characters are portrayed.
b. Read a biography (with your counselor’s approval) of someone who has made a contribution to America’s heritage. Tell some things you admire about this individual and some things you do not admire. Explain why you think this person has made a positive or a negative contribution to America’s heritage.
c. Listen to recordings of popular songs from various periods of American history. Share five of these songs with your counselor, and describe how each song reflects the way people felt about the period in which it was popular. If a recording is not available, have a copy of the lyrics available.

6. Discuss with your counselor the career opportunities in American heritage. Pick one that interests you and explain how to prepare for this career. Discuss what education and training are required for this career.

Interested in joining a YES class as an individual scout? Visit Homeschooling WDW for information on upcoming trips.Interested in joining a YES class as a Scout Troop? Request more information from Penny at Pixie and Pirate Destinations, LLC.