Cub Scout: Home & Family

Cub Scout: Home & Family

During your Walt Disney World vacation, your scout will have the opportunity to practice his home & family skills as you plan for your vacation, while traveling to WDW, dining at the restaurants, and visiting the parks.

Throughout the Cub Scout ranks, there are many Home & Family goals built into the adventures including:

  • Appreciating diversity and each Scout’s unique family heritage
  • Being observant
  • Building skills
  • Developing confidence, and encouraging bravery and patience
  • Developing patience and perseverance as they train their pets
  • Following directions
  • Home repair knowledge and skills
  • Learning some basics about project planning (selecting a project, evaluating what is needed, choosing the proper type of wood, etc.)
  • Learning the benefits of having loyal pets and being loyal to them in return
  • Motor skills
  • Showing creativity and artistic skills with the final project
  • Showing respect and kindness for animals
  • Understanding basic tools and tool safety
  • Using math skills while measuring
  • Working with wood to create a project
A Scout is trustworthy, helpful, courteous, obedient, and kind while practicing home & family skills.

 

Plan a family or scout pack/troop camping trip to Walt Disney World.


Scouting WDW

Scouting with the mouse ideas – practice home & family goals while:

Planning for your Disney World Resort & Park Visit

Traveling to Walt Disney World

Dining at Disney World Restaurants

Visiting Disney World Parks


TigerScoutBearScoutWebelosScoutAOLScout

Related Cub Scout Adventure Electives:
• Tiger Core Adventure: Team Tiger

• Tiger Elective Adventure: Family Stories

This adventure will help Tigers learn about their families and their heritage.

• Bear Elective Adventure: Baloo the Builder

Learning to work with wood to create fun and useful items is a good skill for anyone to have. This adventure will expose the Bear Scout to the safe and proper use of hand tools, how to determine the correct type of wood for a project, and how to construct an item. The adventure also offers a good opportunity to bring parents of the Scouts or other adults with woodworking skills into the den setting, asking them to help with some of the technical aspects. This adventure can also serve as an introduction to the Boy Scout Woodworking merit badge offered.

• Bear Elective Adventure: Critter Care

Bear Scouts will learn how caring for a pet fosters responsibility and offers a sense of companionship that they can nurture and cherish throughout their lives. This adventure also gives them an opportunity to learn about the many ways animals return the favor and assist people in need.

• Webelos / AOL Elective Adventure: Build It

This adventure can assist Webelos Scouts as they develop building and motor skills, tool knowledge, and good safety practices. It also helps them gain appreciation for several forms of craftsmanship.

• Webelos / AOL Elective Adventure: Fix It

This adventure will help Scouts develop their motor skills and increase their knowledge of tools and safety procedures. Each boy will gain the confidence he needs to react properly and help out if certain home or auto repairs are needed.


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Bear Elective Adventure: Critter Care

Bear Elective Adventure: Critter Care

1. Care for a pet for two weeks. Make a list of tasks you did to take care of the pet. If you do not have a pet, research one that you would like to have and write about the care it needs.
2. Learn more about your pet or a pet you would like to have. List three interesting facts that you learned about your pet.
3. Make a poster about your pet or a pet you would like to own. Share your poster with your den, pack, or family.
4. Do your best to train a pet to perform a trick or follow a simple command, and explain how you trained it. (If your pet is a hermit crab, fish, snake, or the like, you may skip this requirement.)
5. Tell three ways that animals can help people.
6. Tell what is meant by an animal being “rabid.” Name some animals that could have rabies. Explain what you should do if you are near an animal that might be rabid.
7. Visit with a local veterinarian or animal shelter caretaker. Find out what types of animals he or she might see on a regular basis. Ask what type of education is needed to become a veterinarian or shelter caretaker and why he or she chose to pursue this career.


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